How to Cover a Support Pole in the Basement

What to do with that support pole in the basement?

Do you have ugly metal poles in your basement wondering what to do with them? Maybe you want to knock down a wall on the main floor but not sure what to do with a support beam.  Those unsightly support beams or metal poles don’t have to remain unsightly.

Here are some options:

 

1.  Pole Covers, Pole Wraps or Column Covers

The least expensive option to cover those poles are by using pole wraps, pole covers or column covers.  Whatever you want to call them, it will do the trick.

The big box stores carry a variety of inexpensive pole covers from faux wood to paint ready smooth covers.  Smaller speciality stores also carry more upscale type of covers.

support beam, garden web

Support cover can be painted to cover and hide the ugly support beams. Photo from gardenweb.com

 

pole beam cover, basementideacom

Found on Basementideas.com

 

You can also have custom made covers to compliment built-in custom cabinetry or do-it-yourself if you’re handy.

Click here to read DIY Network’s full post on How to build a box around a support beam.

 

support beam, how to build, diy
Build a box around a support beam. Photo from DIY Network.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This homeowner had stone columns built around the support beams.  The stone columns add architectural interest to the room while hiding the necessary posts.

stone wood pole cover, basement ideas, houzz

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This creative homeowner recycled old porch supports to cover her beams.

support beam, recycling old front posts, found on brookegiannetti.typepadcom
Recycled old front posts makes an ingenious support beam cover. Found on brookegiannetti.typepad.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

With that whole rustic trend going on right now, reclaimed wood is another great idea to cover up those ugly poles.

pole beam cover, reclaimed wood 2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2. Use the Pole

Another popular way to “cover” support beams is too actually include the pole in the design.  Most common uses are as part of a breakfast bar, or family room bar, as a bookshelf, a room divider or a combination bookshelf/room divider.

 

support beam, homeadore
Photo found on Homeadore.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Covering a post and putting a bar there is a clever way of using the beams.

support beam, bar, houzz
Photo found on Houzz.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The support beam becomes part of a trendy contemporary bookshelf.  It’s hard to tell if just one or are two beams are actually needed.

support beam, shelving

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

support beam becomes a bookshelf, meccinteriors
Found on Meccinteriors

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

support beam as bookshelf, houzz
The support beams doubles as a book shelf and room divider. Photo found on Houzz.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3. The Pole Becomes Part of the Design

When the posts become part of the design, you don’t notice that there are support beams in the room.  The posts flow naturally throughout the space and it’s difficult to tell which post is decoration and which post is actually holding up the floor.

 

basement-renovation-princeton-design-collaborative
Renovation by: Princeton Design Collaborative of New Jersey. Photo found on their website.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

With a support beam on either side of the kitchen island, and the beams incorporated into the ceiling, the support beam has become part of the design.

support beam, part of the design, kitchen
Photo found on Hazelwood Building Contractors.com website. Company based in UK.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ashton Kutcher surprised his mom for Mother’s Day with this basement (below) of her dreams.  Designer Catherine Renae Thomas incorporates the support beams into the design so one can’t tell which beam is really necessary and which one isn’t.  The beams look like they were meant to be there and divides the various functions of the basement naturally.

Ashton Kutcher's parents basement, design Catherine Renae Thomas Design Co.

Basement design by Catherine Renae Thomas Design Co. Photo found on Houzz.com

 

It has become a very popular option on home renovation shows to show renovators removing support beams or load bearing walls on either the main floor and basement.  This is an option but it is by far,  the most expensive and difficult way of dealing with the support poles or beams. Support beams support thousands of pounds of weight. Moving or removing these posts improperly could result in the floor sagging and affect the integrity of the structure of your home.    You need to hire a structural engineer and general contractor who has lots of experience moving support beams to access whether it is in fact a possibility.  Sometimes, the cost does not warrant moving the post.  But don’t fret, we have just seen lots of great options to try in our home.

What idea are you going to do?

 

Debi Carser is a Designer.  She renovates “fixer uppers” to flip or to rent.  She staged houses for 10 years. She has seen houses at their best and their worst. Debi passes on her knowledge to help people Add Value to their Home while making their home a stunning retreat at the same time.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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